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What is glaucoma? Glaucoma is an eye disease that affects the optic nerve hence causing a progressive and complete vision loss. The optic nerve is the main nerve of vision; it receives light from the retina and transmits it to the brain for interpretation as vision. This type of eye disorder develops progressively; it begins with the loss of the peripheral vision and then loss of the central vision. Due to its slow development process symptoms may go unnoticed hence the condition is termed as the silent vision killer. Glaucoma blocks the drainage system of the eyes clear fluid hence leading to fluid build up and increased eye pressure. Due to this the optic nerve deteriorates and if left untreated total blindness may result.

What is glaucoma and its various forms? Glaucoma is classified into two main types that is, the open and closed angle glaucoma. The closed angle glaucoma is also termed as acute angle closure glaucoma. It is presented with immediate pain and eye discomfort which ensures quick treatment hence prevention of vision loss. The open angle glaucoma is also referred to as chronic glaucoma. This form develops slowly and the individual may not notice since he or she may not feel any discomfort. This leads to vision loss hence eye doctors recommend regular check ups in order to avoid such occurrences.

Other types of glaucoma include: low tension glaucoma, prigmentary glaucoma, secondary glaucoma and congenital glaucoma.
What is glaucoma and its presented signs and symptoms? Glaucoma patients mainly present with the following signs and symptoms. Eye pain, nausea, vomiting, blurry vision and halos around light. Individuals who have this signs should seek medical attention. Treatment methods for glaucoma depend on the severity of the condition. These forms of treatment involve glaucoma surgery, medications such as eye drops and the laser treatment.

Glaucoma is an eye disease that is associated with a dangerous build up of internal eye pressure that can severely damage the optic nerve. For the majority of cases, including the most common, open-angle form, there are no discernible glaucoma symptoms until the optic nerve is damaged and a person’s peripheral vision is lost. If it is undiagnosed or left untreated it can eventually lead to blindness.

The most common form, called open-angle glaucoma, initially has no visible symptoms. The pressure in the eye builds up gradually and then at some point the optic nerve comes damaged enough to cause peripheral vision loss. Similarly, people with normal-tension glaucoma will not experience any symptoms until they begin to lose peripheral vision.

Acute angle-closure glaucoma is the result of a sudden blockage in the normal flow of eye fluid (aqueous humour) between the iris and the lens. In this case, symptoms might include severe pain, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, and seeing a rainbow halo around lights. This type of glaucoma is a medical emergency that has to be treated immediately or blindness could result in only one or two days. Angle-closure glaucoma progresses at a much slower rate and can damage the optic nerve without symptoms.

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. As many as half of the individuals with glaucoma, however, may not know that they have the disease. It is also this invisibility that makes it imperative for people to have their eyes examined regularly for glaucoma or other diseases that have serious complications or cause damage. Although nerve damage and visual loss from glaucoma cannot usually be reversed, glaucoma is a disease that can generally be controlled. Treatment can make the intraocular pressure normal and help to prevent or stop further nerve damage and visual loss. Treatment may involve the use of eye drops, pills (rarely), laser ,or surgery.
Depending on what stage your are through early detection rather than late stage glaucoma symptoms, your doctor will determine your best treatment. Because glaucoma is often painless and invisible, people may become careless about adhering to their use of eye drops or other treatments. It is important to stick to your treatment plan to control eye pressure and prevent permanent vision loss or blindness in the future.

Glaucoma is an eye disorder that is characterized by build-up of intraocular eye pressure; it is mainly defined as an eye disease that damages the optic nerve. The optic nerve is the main visual nerve that is located at the back of the eye it is responsible for transmitting visual information to the brain that is, it receives light which are generated nerve impulses from the retina and transmits them to the brain. The brain then interprets the electrical signals and we recognize them via our eyes as vision. Glaucoma is not always associated with intraocular eye pressure since some cases have been reported to have been caused by poor blood flow to the optic nerve.

Glaucoma symptoms occur when there is increased fluid pressure that is the aqueous humour which nourishes the eye. If it increases elevated eye pressure results hence the eye becomes hard and if not treated blindness may result. After cataract it is the second leading cause of blindness.

Glaucoma is diagnosed via use of a tonometer which measures the intraocular pressure; the other methods used include various technologies: scanning laser polarimetry, optical coherence tomography and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy technologies that create baseline images and measure the optic nerve and the eyes internal structures.

Glaucoma treatment mainly depends on the extent of severity and it can be treated via glaucoma surgery, medications, lasers or eye drops which are used to lower the intraocular pressure and also to control glaucoma.

Glaucoma symptoms depend on the type of glaucoma an individual has that is there are two types of glaucoma; open angle and closed angle glaucoma. Open angle glaucoma is characterized with high intraocular pressure that leads to an individual developing tunnel vision which helps the patient to see objects that are straight ahead. It is not painful and no acute attacks occur, the signs involved are: visual field loss and changes of the optic nerve.

Closed angle Glaucoma symptoms appear suddenly and they are: eye pain that is severe, visual disturbance in low light environments, red eye, seeing halos around light, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting.

Glaucoma is a type of eye disease that affects the optic nerve, glaucoma symptoms vary depending on the type of glaucoma you have. The optic nerve is the major nerve of vision; it receives light generated nerve impulses from the retina and transmits it to the brain for them to be recognised as vision. It is associated with the build-up of eye pressure also known as the intraocular pressure, which leads to the damage of the optic nerve.

Intraocular pressure is not always associated with glaucoma since one can get the disease even during a normal eye pressure. This occurs due to poor regulation of the flow of blood to the optic nerve. The process of getting the disease begins with the loss of peripheral vision and if not treated at this stage it leads to blindness.

Glaucoma is categorised into two that is; open angle glaucoma and closed angle glaucoma the angle mainly means the area between the iris and cornea. This area is where the fluid flows in order for it to escape through the trabecular meshwork. Closed angle glaucoma appears immediately and it is painful, this leads to quick visual loss. Open angle glaucoma progresses slowly and it is not noticed immediately until the disease progresses.

Glaucoma symptoms are categorised according to the type, open-angle glaucoma involves the following symptoms; gradual loss of the visual field and a raised cup to disc ratio. The people who are at a high risk of getting this type of glaucoma are the elderly and those with a family history of the disease. Closed-angle glaucoma involves; nausea, red eye, vomiting, viewing halos around lights, mild dilated pupil, high intraocular pressure, sudden pain in the eyes and decreased vision, these symptoms are only mild.

Glaucoma symptoms may also present themselves at birth; this is known as congenital glaucoma or may develop during the first years of life which is known as infantile glaucoma. These symptoms include; watery eyes, cloudy eyes, enlarged eyeballs due to high pressure and closing the eyes for long. Glaucoma can be brought by various causes such as; diet, genetics, ethnicity and gender.

Glaucoma is a category of eye disorders that are associated with a dangerous build up of internal eye pressure that can severely damage the optic nerve. They eye’s optic never is what transmits information to the brain and it’s essential to our eyesight. If it is undiagnosed or left untreated or uncontrolled, glaucoma begins by first attacking the peripheral vision causing seeing loss that can eventually lead to blindness. Glaucoma symptoms are rarely visible and can go unnoticed for a long time until vision loss occurs.

It is this invisibility that causes glaucoma to progress undetected until the optic nerve has been damaged, causing varying degrees of permanent vision loss from very slight to very extreme. The symptoms for acute angle-closure glaucoma can occur quite suddenly and show up in the form of blurry vision, halos around lights, intense eye pain, nausea and vomiting. If you or anyone you know is experiencing these types of glaucoma symptoms then make sure you see an eye doctor immediately or visit the emergency room. This will ensure that the proper steps are taken to prevent permanent blindness.

It is also this invisibility that makes it imperative for people to have their eyes examined regularly for glaucoma or other diseases that have serious complications or cause damage. During a routine eye exam, a machine called a tonometer is used to measure they eye’s intraocular pressure (IOP). An abnormally high IOP reading will mean that the eye is producing too much fluid, or it’s not draining properly. Other methods of monitoring glaucoma involve the use of sophisticated imaging technology like lasers, optical coherence and confocal scanning. All of these help to create baseline images and measurements of the eye’s optic nerve and internal structures including the fluid levels.

If you discover that you have glaucoma symptoms your doctor determine what stage you are at prescribe treatment. Treatment can be glaucoma surgery, lasers, medication or eye drops aimed at lowering the IOP. Because glaucoma is often painless and invisible, people may become careless about adhering to their use of eye drops or other treatments. It is important to stick to your treatment plan to control eye pressure and prevent permanent vision loss or blindness.